Expanding our services

Our work to get closer to our range of partners and stakeholders – including forest owners, producers and retailers – enables us to innovate and build out our services to create value for people and the environment.

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Using earth observation to protect our integrity

FSC is on a mission to be a global leader in digital innovation and certification. 2018 was the year where we set the stage for delivering on this mission. We laid the foundations for our work with Earth observation to strengthen the integrity of the FSC system.

In 2018, we established partnerships with global leading geographic information system (GIS) experts to build an FSC platform to publish maps showing FSC certified forests. This included building the GIS infrastructure to allow data to flow securely, and for geospatial analysis to be performed.
 

Wood identification to combat illegal logging

FSC’s supply chain integrity programme has been on the cutting edge for years, using scientific wood identification techniques – like isotope referencing – to strengthen the veracity of FSC-certified product claims.

In 2018, in collaboration with leading experts and laboratories like the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, the US Forest Service Forest Products Lab, the US Forest Service International Program, and the Agroisolab in the UK, FSC scaled up its efforts to collect wood reference samples, in the form of isotope signatures, to provide more accurate detection of supply chain issues, and in turn, to support taking action on legality issues like illegal logging.

In 2018, we scaled up our collection of geo-referenced wood samples of timber in FSC certified forests in 12 countries. We also helped to pioneer a new model for collecting reference samples by defining the minimum viable sample to be collected (a piece of wood and a leaf) and the satellite positioning coordinates of where the sample was taken.
 

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Highlight

How a group of Tanzanian villagers have seen their lives improve thanks to a local tree called ‘mpingo’